how to find motivation back at work

#22 : 3 insights to find my motivation back at work

Lost Motivation

The biggest problem by far that leaders are facing is a loss in motivation. Have you been feeling less motivated at work? You are not alone! But why are so many people losing their motivation? Many people are losing their motivation because they do not have the impact that they want. 

The Importance of Having an Impact

Leaders feel like they do not have the impact that they want. In my Leadership quiz, the number one dream that people who have lost their motivation have is that they wish they could have more impact. Many leaders are working really hard and do not see enough positive results for all the hard work, so of course, motivation is low! 

Some ways that you can lose impact can be being only a small part of a bigger project, having too many tasks and a very long to-do list, and the overwhelming focus on being a productive machine. Often the process of a project can be divided over several different departments with each department having their own objective. It’s hard when you always need to do more – more tasks, producing more revenue, more cost savings, more alignment, and always more and more producing. This leaves little time to reflect or even step back and can cause you to lose motivation. 

Loss of Impact Leads to Lack of Meaning

If you are no longer seeing the value of your work in the organization, that can lead to a lack of meaning. Maybe you are no longer aligned with the true values or the true purpose of the organization? You may feel disconnected from the values and the purpose of the organization. What you see may not align with your values or the leaders claim one thing but do another. These are the ways that leaders lose purpose, their meaning, and the motivation at work.

How Do I Become Motivated Again?

Work no longer is about having the basic elements met. People are looking for meaning and a bigger purpose in life. There are three things that you can do to be happier and more motivated at work. 

  • Focus on Your Purpose 

Think deeply about what you care about and what is important to you. Once you know what is truly important to you, you may think that promotion you didn’t get, the big fancy car you don’t have, or the salary increase was not that important in the big scheme of things. Once you realize what your purpose is and what your values are, you can start fulfilling your purpose within your organization. 

  • Become Better at What You Do 

A lot of our habits might be habits that once served you well in the past. These habits can be things like being action-oriented, delivering everything that is requested from you, and managing your time. If you want to be successful in these fast-changing digital times, you will have to adopt new habits. Try to improve yourself by adopting new habits that will serve you today. 

  • More Autonomy 

A lot of leaders and people in general believe they have no choice. When you believe that you have no choice, then you are saying yes to the bad decisions that have been imposed on you or you can simply accept a certain situation. That’s when you don’t want to try to change things. Instead, there needs to be more autonomy in the workplace to be successful. You can accomplish this by using the Trade Method to help you sell your ideas like a pro!

 

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